programs

The Keystone Honors Academy creates a creative learning community by offering a number of programs intended to enhance the scholarly environment on campus, and to provide students with professional growth and cultural awareness.

  • Graduate Programming and Professional Development
  • Cultural Events and Activities
  • Curriculum
  • Honda Campus All Star Challenge
  • Emlen Living Learning Center and Programs
  • Policies and Student Obligations

 

 

 

 
Cheyney University Honors Curriculum
 
The Keystone Honors Academy, like the University, takes a holistic approach to student development, and seeks to graduate students with the habits of mind, practice, and heart to be visionary leaders and responsible citizens of this globalized 21st century. As the University strives to compete in a highly competitive market for high academic achievers, the Honors Academy Curriculum is designed to meet the needs, engage and prepare these talented students. The Honors Curriculum at CU is grounded in our understanding that high achievers among the millennial generation expect and demand the fullest academic honors experience and associated perquisites possible in order to compete for advanced graduate study and for professional placement.
 
Honors Curriculum. In keeping with the goal of the Keystone Honors Academy to provide an enhanced scholarly environment, the honors curriculum has several goals:
  1. Provide an atmosphere that is conducive to learning for the academically talented student, whereby special attention is given to pedagogical interests of an honors student (innovative teaching and incorporation of technology in the classroom).
  2. Encourage the independent pursuit and appreciation of intellectual achievement 
  3. Reinforce and cultivate critical reading, writing, and thinking as tools for receiving, sharing, and clarifying knowledge
  4. Provide opportunities for ethical awareness and leadership
  5. Provide curricular elements that require the honors student to engage with course content at a more sophisticated level:
    1. Highly dialogic classroom
    2. Extended writing requirements
    3. Encouraged original research
    4. Applied learning experiences, including service learning
    5. More rigorous and accelerated coursework beyond a standard course of study
 
The Honors Student Leaning Outcomes consist of five broad learning competencies to help students achieve the following:
 
I.         Effective Communication Skills and Proficiency in Interpreting Texts
·         Display proficient verbal, non-verbal and written forms of communication.
·         Prove appropriate reading, writing and speaking skills.
·         Demonstrate the ability to use technology that supports communication.
·         Ability to critically read and analyze texts, display proficiency in interpreting, paraphrasing and evaluating the written word.
 
II.        Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving, and Information Literacy
·         Demonstrate a high level of ability to think critically and analytically, and to solve problems using basic research, analysis and interpretation.
·         Display mastery of the relationships among arts, sciences
and technology.
·         Illustrate the proficient ability to identify, locate, evaluate, and use         informational tools for research purposes.
·         Demonstrate ability to develop a culminating educational project within the students’ chosen major, and to develop an original concept within the traditions of their chosen discipline.
 
III.      Personal, Social and Civic Responsibility        
·         Demonstrate high ethical and cultural awareness and respect for diversity
·         Show strong appreciation for a global perspective
·         Apply appropriate modes of social interaction among peers, colleagues and community.
·         Express exemplary knowledge of self-management, health and wellness,
·         Demonstrate a vast knowledge of leadership literature and a high level of leadership competence.
         
IV.      African American Heritage
·         Display advanced knowledge of African and African American history, artistic or literary production and its impact.
·         Demonstrate exceptional knowledge of and value for the history of Cheyney University and other HBCUs as important sites of education.
 
V.        Cultural Expression/Literacy     
·         Demonstrate superior engagement with and appreciation for global expressions of the arts and of other cultural elements.
·         Show a deep understanding that all forms of art and culture are collaborative constructs which are distinctly rich and internationally distinct.          


 
Curriculum Structure
The Honors Curriculum at CU follows a hybrid model, including a core of required honors courses, addendum courses that allow students to take an upper-level course (additional assignments beyond those ordinarily required in the course), a senior thesis/project and a service requirement. Students must maintain a minimum of a B average each semester. A total of 20 credit hours in honors courses and completion of an honors thesis/project are required for receipt of honors designation on the diploma. Students transferring to Cheyney from honors programs may be evaluated to determine if coursework satisfies Cheyney’s honors curriculum requirements.      
Explanation of Terms:
Addenda or Course by Contract - By means of an Honors Contract with the professor, an Honors student will be permitted to undertake additional assignments beyond those ordinarily required in the course in order to receive Honors credits for the course. The Honors contract must be approved by the professor teaching the course and by the Dean of the Honors Academy in advance of the student taking the course.
Honors Addendum Contract – An agreement established between the honors faculty and the honors students which outlines the component of the course that is specific to the honors program and which will satisfy the requirements of the honors program. Guidelines for the contract and an honors rubric will help provide uniformity in the quality of instruction provided in honors courses. Honors Addenda are approved by the Dean of the Honors Academy.
Capstone Thesis/Project - A distinctive feature of the Honors Program is a thesis/project, which is considered to be the culminating accomplishment of every student in the program. Each academic major at the University has a capstone course/experience that will serve as the vehicle for a focused individualized instruction to complete a senior thesis/project. The topic and scope of the thesis/project will be determined by the student in consultation with the supervising professor and the Honors Dean. Completion of the thesis/project will be noted on the student's record.
Honors Faculty – Honors faculty are members of the faculty who have distinguished themselves through research, service and teaching and who are trained to provide coursework appropriate to an honors designated course.  
Addendum Course in Upper Division Courses:
Students are required to take credits in an upper division course, within the students’ major field of study. This course should be taken the second semester of the junior year or the first semester of the senior year and is intended to prepare the student for study with an instructor to prepare a senior thesis project in the capstone course.


 
Requirements
Required Honors Core
Honors students seeking honors designation on the diploma are required to complete the following honors core courses (total of 14 credit hours). The required honors core courses will be used as the free electives that each academic major allows, and all satisfy the requirements of the general education curriculum. Six credit hours are within the student’s major, and are taken as addenda courses. These courses result in a senior honors thesis or project.
 
First Year:
(1) Honors First Year Seminar I
(1) Honors First Year Seminar 2
(3) Honors English II – H-HEN113
(3) Honors Critical Thinking – H-HPH110
 
Sophomore Year:
(3) Honors African American Experience in the Global Context
(3) Honors coursework in a discipline which incorporates service learning components
 
Junior Year:
(3) 300 or 400 Level Writing Intensive Course within Student’s Major (Addendum)
 
Senior Year:
(3) Capstone Course with Honors Thesis/Project (Addendum)
 
Honors Designation on Diploma
Honors students seeking the honors designation on their diploma are required to complete the fourteen credit hours in core honors general education courses. Six credit hours of honors designated upper division courses are required within the students’ major, resulting in an honors thesis or project. Additionally, Honors students who enter the program as first-year students are required to participate in the Honors Freshman Seminar course and if a residential student, reside in a designated Honors Learning Community so as to begin to build a sense of community amongst them. Satisfactory progress (minimum of a B in each course), completion of all 20 required Honors Courses, an approved honors thesis or capstone project and satisfactory progress in the obligations of the Honors Academy will result in the conferring of honors designation on the student’s diploma.
 
Transfer students must complete all of the established requirements in order to receive honors designation. Honors coursework from prior institutions may be evaluated to determine if such courses satisfy requisite Cheyney Honors requirements. Articulation agreements with honors programs at area community colleges are being sought.
 
Transfer students into the honors program must complete honors coursework designated for the cohort in which they enter (ex: students entering as juniors must complete a 300 or 400 level writing intensive course with an honors addendum, and complete a capstone course with an honors thesis/project in their senior year).
HONORS RUBRIC
Standards applied to all honors coursework
 
All proposed honors coursework must meet with the standards outlined herein, and be consistent with the Honors Student Leaning Outcomes and Learning Competencies below. The faculty member and student agree to uphold the standards described herein:
 
I.         Effective Communication Skills and Proficiency in Interpreting Texts
·         Display proficient verbal, non-verbal and written forms of communication.
·         Prove appropriate reading, writing and speaking skills.
·         Demonstrate the ability to use technology that supports communication.
·         Ability to critically read and analyze texts, display proficiency in interpreting, paraphrasing and evaluating the written word.
 
II.        Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving, and Information Literacy
·         Demonstrate a high level of ability to think critically and analytically, and to solve problems using basic research, analysis and interpretation.
·         Display mastery of the relationships among arts, sciences
and technology.
·         Illustrate the proficient ability to identify, locate, evaluate, and use         informational tools for research purposes.
·         Demonstrate ability to develop a culminating educational project within the students’ chosen major, and to develop an original concept within the traditions of their chosen discipline.
 
 
  1. In what ways will participation in this course encourage dialog and engagement with course materials? How will learning extend beyond fact gathering and recall?
 
 
  1.  In what capacity will the student complete extended writing requirements? 
 
 
  1. Will the student engage in any research? To what extent?
 
 
  1. How will the course include applied learning experiences?
 
 
  1. Describe how this course will incorporate more rigorous and accelerated coursework beyond a standard course of study.
 
 


 

HONORS CAPSTONE THESIS/PROJECT PROPOSAL

The Honors Curriculum at Cheyney University culminates in a Capstone Project. The Project is supervised by a Faculty Director (usually in the student’s major discipline) who is joined for purposes of final evaluation by the Dean of the Honors Academy. The project may be completed in either semester of the senior year as a part of the student’s capstone course. While many projects will take the traditional form of the senior thesis, acceptable alternatives include art exhibits, performances, and works of fiction. However, all projects will involve a significant written component and will culminate in a public presentation and defense for faculty and students. The successful presentation will communicate the results of a specialist’s inquiry to a general audience. This form must be completed and approved.

Please print or type the following information:


STUDENT______________________________________________________________

FACULTY DIRECTOR __________________________________________________


PROJECT TITLE ________________________________________________________

Semester (s) to be enrolled ________________ Semester credit hours ____________

Complete the project timeline on reverse and attach a 100-200 word abstract and a preliminary bibliography.

APPROVAL OF PROPOSAL                                                             DATE

STUDENT ________________________________________           _______________

FACULTY DIRECTOR______________________________          _______________

ACADEMIC ADVISOR _____________________________          _______________

HONORS DEAN ______________________________          _______________

PROJECT TIMELINE

Week 1 ____________________________________________________________

Week 2 ____________________________________________________________

Week 3 ____________________________________________________________

Week 4 ____________________________________________________________

Week 5 ____________________________________________________________

Week 6 ____________________________________________________________

Week 7 First draft submitted for review _________________________________

Week 8 Oral review of first draft ______________________________________

This important review of progress in the seventh and eighth weeks is
designed to ensure that all three faculty involved are up to date on
progress and to give the student valuable feedback well in advance of
the final evaluation. The written draft – which may well be partial
at this point but in many cases will include a completed literature
review – will be read and commented on by all three readers in advance
of the meeting scheduled with the student during the eighth week.

Week 9 ____________________________________________________________

Week 10 ____________________________________________________________

Week 11 ____________________________________________________________

Week 12 Final draft submitted __________________________________________

Week 13 ____________________________________________________________

Week 14 Oral defense ________________________________________________


 
HONORS RUBRIC AND PROCEDURES FOR UPPER DIVISION HONORS ADDENDUM
 
Procedures
  1. Student meets with the prospective faculty member teaching the upper division course they wish to take as an honors addenda at least one semester before the course is offered.
  2. Student presents Honors Rubric and completes the Honors Contract with the faculty member.
  3. Once a course and assignment plan is designed through the Honors Contract, consistent with Honors Rubric, the faculty and student sign the form in agreement.
  4. The student presents the Honors Contract to the Dean of the Keystone Honors Academy for Approval. The Dean notifies the student, faculty member and the Office of the Registrar of approval.
 
Honors Rubric and Addendum Contract
  1.  In what ways will participation in this course encourage dialog and engagement with course materials? How will learning extend beyond fact gathering and recall?
 
 
 
  1.  In what capacity will the student complete extended writing requirements? 
 
 
 
  1. How will the student produce a prospectus for their Honors Capstone Thesis/Project?
 
 
 
  1. Will the student engage in any research? To what extent?
 
 
 
  1. How will the course include applied learning experiences?
 
 
 
  1. Describe how this course will incorporate more rigorous and accelerated coursework beyond a standard course of study.
 
 


As described on the previous page, it is agreed that this course satisfies the Keystone Honors Academy Requirements and coursework complements and reflects the Honors Student Leaning Outcomes and Learning Competencies below. The faculty member and student agree to uphold the standards described herein:
 
I.         Effective Communication Skills and Proficiency in Interpreting Texts
·         Display proficient verbal, non-verbal and written forms of communication.
·         Prove appropriate reading, writing and speaking skills.
·         Demonstrate the ability to use technology that supports communication.
·         Ability to critically read and analyze texts, display proficiency in interpreting, paraphrasing and evaluating the written word.
 
II.        Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving, and Information Literacy
·         Demonstrate a high level of ability to think critically and analytically, and to solve problems using basic research, analysis and interpretation.
·         Display mastery of the relationships among arts, sciences
and technology.
·         Illustrate the proficient ability to identify, locate, evaluate, and use         informational tools for research purposes.
·         Demonstrate ability to develop a culminating educational project within the students’ chosen major, and to develop an original concept within the traditions of their chosen discipline.
 
Signed:                                                                                              Print and Date
 
Faculty/Instructor of Course
 
Honors Student
 
Dean, Keystone Honors Academy
 
 
Received by the Office of the Registrar: