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Cheyney University STEM Students to Benefit from National Science Foundation Funding

PRNewswire

July 31, 2014

The new science center and planetarium at Cheyney University will open for classes this fall, providing state-of-the-art facilities to groom STEM students seeking careers in the sciences, technology and math.

The new science center and planetarium at Cheyney University will open for classes this fall, providing state-of-the-art facilities to groom STEM students seeking careers in the sciences, technology and math.

WASHINGTON, July 30, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Congressman Chaka Fattah (PA-02), the lead appropriator for the National Science Foundation (NSF), announced today that Drexel University was awarded $3.175 million from the agency to significantly increase the number of students completing high quality degree programs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

The funding from NSF will support the Greater Philadelphia Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program. Headed by Drexel, the initiative includes STEM outreach and retention programs at eight additional area institutions: Cheyney University, Delaware State University, Lincoln University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Temple University, University of Delaware, University of Pennsylvania, and the Community College of Philadelphia.

"By encouraging more minority students to complete STEM degrees at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, this program is significantly expanding the number of future mathematicians, engineers, scientists, and researchers," Congressman Fattah said. "For far too long, minorities have been unrepresented in these fields. To continue to compete on a global level and lead the world in innovation and technology, the United States must entice more students to enter and remain in these growing professions. "

In the next five years, LSAMP has chosen to specifically focus on increasing the engagement of undergraduate STEM students in national and international research experiences, expanding the coordinated movement of community college students to 4-year institutions, and enhancing inter-institutional connectivity.

Fattah who has been one of Congress' strongest STEM advocates, has been a principal supporter of the LSAMP program in Philadelphia. The program's goals overlap with the Fattah-founded Graduate Opportunity Initiative Conference (now called the National Conference on Higher Education) that is designed to increase underrepresented students in graduate and professional schools.

"The Greater Philadelphia Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation is excited about the opportunity to continue the good work of the previous 20 years, and expand the program's footprint going forward. Already we have graduated over 12,000 students with STEM baccalaureate degrees, 3,000 master's students, and 350 PhDs," said Stephen Cox, Co-Principle Investigator and AMP Project Director. "Congressman Fattah has given personal attention to the program, making sure that it not only stands financially, but that it receives appropriate support from the right people on the government as well as the academic side."

For additional information on the LSAMP grant visit the NSF Award Abstracts database, please visit: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/.